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theeverimaginable:

radtasticly-anomalous:

sirdexrjones:

You often feature Black people in a positive, stylish and sometimes provocative light. Is there a specific reason for this?
"I don’t know when it all started, but for a years, I’ve been very color-conscious. I’ve been very race-conscious, and I’m very aware that I’m not just an artist, but a black artist. And I have no problem with that. I’m very careful about how we are portrayed. I know that if you google the word ‘beauty’ right now, 99.9 percent of the faces that come up will be a white woman’s face, and that’s a bit astonishing. And, I don’t know, I just feel like images speak volumes, and when I speak to people through my images, I just want to make sure I’m saying something positive when it comes to the issue of Black women or Black men.
I also tell negative stories, I can show an ugly side or tell an ugly truth, but at the end of it all I want the message to be something beautiful and positive that not just Black people can relate to but everyone can relate to, and I want everyone to understand it. But that’s not always going to happen. Not everyone is going to look at my work and see beautiful, stylized, somewhat provocative photos. I guess some people will just see ‘ugly naked bodies’ or ‘pornographic images’; ‘uncombed afros’ or long ‘unkempt dreadlocks’. But that’s kind of why the image is out there, to expose people to those images more, and desensitize them to it.  Black power is still scary to a lot of people.  It shouldn’t be something to be afraid of.  Black Power is a necessity.”
- Dexter Ryan Jones (artist/photographer)IG: sirdexrjones

yes!

Love this. It’s so fabulous.
theeverimaginable:

radtasticly-anomalous:

sirdexrjones:

You often feature Black people in a positive, stylish and sometimes provocative light. Is there a specific reason for this?
"I don’t know when it all started, but for a years, I’ve been very color-conscious. I’ve been very race-conscious, and I’m very aware that I’m not just an artist, but a black artist. And I have no problem with that. I’m very careful about how we are portrayed. I know that if you google the word ‘beauty’ right now, 99.9 percent of the faces that come up will be a white woman’s face, and that’s a bit astonishing. And, I don’t know, I just feel like images speak volumes, and when I speak to people through my images, I just want to make sure I’m saying something positive when it comes to the issue of Black women or Black men.
I also tell negative stories, I can show an ugly side or tell an ugly truth, but at the end of it all I want the message to be something beautiful and positive that not just Black people can relate to but everyone can relate to, and I want everyone to understand it. But that’s not always going to happen. Not everyone is going to look at my work and see beautiful, stylized, somewhat provocative photos. I guess some people will just see ‘ugly naked bodies’ or ‘pornographic images’; ‘uncombed afros’ or long ‘unkempt dreadlocks’. But that’s kind of why the image is out there, to expose people to those images more, and desensitize them to it.  Black power is still scary to a lot of people.  It shouldn’t be something to be afraid of.  Black Power is a necessity.”
- Dexter Ryan Jones (artist/photographer)IG: sirdexrjones

yes!

Love this. It’s so fabulous.
theeverimaginable:

radtasticly-anomalous:

sirdexrjones:

You often feature Black people in a positive, stylish and sometimes provocative light. Is there a specific reason for this?
"I don’t know when it all started, but for a years, I’ve been very color-conscious. I’ve been very race-conscious, and I’m very aware that I’m not just an artist, but a black artist. And I have no problem with that. I’m very careful about how we are portrayed. I know that if you google the word ‘beauty’ right now, 99.9 percent of the faces that come up will be a white woman’s face, and that’s a bit astonishing. And, I don’t know, I just feel like images speak volumes, and when I speak to people through my images, I just want to make sure I’m saying something positive when it comes to the issue of Black women or Black men.
I also tell negative stories, I can show an ugly side or tell an ugly truth, but at the end of it all I want the message to be something beautiful and positive that not just Black people can relate to but everyone can relate to, and I want everyone to understand it. But that’s not always going to happen. Not everyone is going to look at my work and see beautiful, stylized, somewhat provocative photos. I guess some people will just see ‘ugly naked bodies’ or ‘pornographic images’; ‘uncombed afros’ or long ‘unkempt dreadlocks’. But that’s kind of why the image is out there, to expose people to those images more, and desensitize them to it.  Black power is still scary to a lot of people.  It shouldn’t be something to be afraid of.  Black Power is a necessity.”
- Dexter Ryan Jones (artist/photographer)IG: sirdexrjones

yes!

Love this. It’s so fabulous.
theeverimaginable:

radtasticly-anomalous:

sirdexrjones:

You often feature Black people in a positive, stylish and sometimes provocative light. Is there a specific reason for this?
"I don’t know when it all started, but for a years, I’ve been very color-conscious. I’ve been very race-conscious, and I’m very aware that I’m not just an artist, but a black artist. And I have no problem with that. I’m very careful about how we are portrayed. I know that if you google the word ‘beauty’ right now, 99.9 percent of the faces that come up will be a white woman’s face, and that’s a bit astonishing. And, I don’t know, I just feel like images speak volumes, and when I speak to people through my images, I just want to make sure I’m saying something positive when it comes to the issue of Black women or Black men.
I also tell negative stories, I can show an ugly side or tell an ugly truth, but at the end of it all I want the message to be something beautiful and positive that not just Black people can relate to but everyone can relate to, and I want everyone to understand it. But that’s not always going to happen. Not everyone is going to look at my work and see beautiful, stylized, somewhat provocative photos. I guess some people will just see ‘ugly naked bodies’ or ‘pornographic images’; ‘uncombed afros’ or long ‘unkempt dreadlocks’. But that’s kind of why the image is out there, to expose people to those images more, and desensitize them to it.  Black power is still scary to a lot of people.  It shouldn’t be something to be afraid of.  Black Power is a necessity.”
- Dexter Ryan Jones (artist/photographer)IG: sirdexrjones

yes!

Love this. It’s so fabulous.
theeverimaginable:

radtasticly-anomalous:

sirdexrjones:

You often feature Black people in a positive, stylish and sometimes provocative light. Is there a specific reason for this?
"I don’t know when it all started, but for a years, I’ve been very color-conscious. I’ve been very race-conscious, and I’m very aware that I’m not just an artist, but a black artist. And I have no problem with that. I’m very careful about how we are portrayed. I know that if you google the word ‘beauty’ right now, 99.9 percent of the faces that come up will be a white woman’s face, and that’s a bit astonishing. And, I don’t know, I just feel like images speak volumes, and when I speak to people through my images, I just want to make sure I’m saying something positive when it comes to the issue of Black women or Black men.
I also tell negative stories, I can show an ugly side or tell an ugly truth, but at the end of it all I want the message to be something beautiful and positive that not just Black people can relate to but everyone can relate to, and I want everyone to understand it. But that’s not always going to happen. Not everyone is going to look at my work and see beautiful, stylized, somewhat provocative photos. I guess some people will just see ‘ugly naked bodies’ or ‘pornographic images’; ‘uncombed afros’ or long ‘unkempt dreadlocks’. But that’s kind of why the image is out there, to expose people to those images more, and desensitize them to it.  Black power is still scary to a lot of people.  It shouldn’t be something to be afraid of.  Black Power is a necessity.”
- Dexter Ryan Jones (artist/photographer)IG: sirdexrjones

yes!

Love this. It’s so fabulous.
theeverimaginable:

radtasticly-anomalous:

sirdexrjones:

You often feature Black people in a positive, stylish and sometimes provocative light. Is there a specific reason for this?
"I don’t know when it all started, but for a years, I’ve been very color-conscious. I’ve been very race-conscious, and I’m very aware that I’m not just an artist, but a black artist. And I have no problem with that. I’m very careful about how we are portrayed. I know that if you google the word ‘beauty’ right now, 99.9 percent of the faces that come up will be a white woman’s face, and that’s a bit astonishing. And, I don’t know, I just feel like images speak volumes, and when I speak to people through my images, I just want to make sure I’m saying something positive when it comes to the issue of Black women or Black men.
I also tell negative stories, I can show an ugly side or tell an ugly truth, but at the end of it all I want the message to be something beautiful and positive that not just Black people can relate to but everyone can relate to, and I want everyone to understand it. But that’s not always going to happen. Not everyone is going to look at my work and see beautiful, stylized, somewhat provocative photos. I guess some people will just see ‘ugly naked bodies’ or ‘pornographic images’; ‘uncombed afros’ or long ‘unkempt dreadlocks’. But that’s kind of why the image is out there, to expose people to those images more, and desensitize them to it.  Black power is still scary to a lot of people.  It shouldn’t be something to be afraid of.  Black Power is a necessity.”
- Dexter Ryan Jones (artist/photographer)IG: sirdexrjones

yes!

Love this. It’s so fabulous.
theeverimaginable:

radtasticly-anomalous:

sirdexrjones:

You often feature Black people in a positive, stylish and sometimes provocative light. Is there a specific reason for this?
"I don’t know when it all started, but for a years, I’ve been very color-conscious. I’ve been very race-conscious, and I’m very aware that I’m not just an artist, but a black artist. And I have no problem with that. I’m very careful about how we are portrayed. I know that if you google the word ‘beauty’ right now, 99.9 percent of the faces that come up will be a white woman’s face, and that’s a bit astonishing. And, I don’t know, I just feel like images speak volumes, and when I speak to people through my images, I just want to make sure I’m saying something positive when it comes to the issue of Black women or Black men.
I also tell negative stories, I can show an ugly side or tell an ugly truth, but at the end of it all I want the message to be something beautiful and positive that not just Black people can relate to but everyone can relate to, and I want everyone to understand it. But that’s not always going to happen. Not everyone is going to look at my work and see beautiful, stylized, somewhat provocative photos. I guess some people will just see ‘ugly naked bodies’ or ‘pornographic images’; ‘uncombed afros’ or long ‘unkempt dreadlocks’. But that’s kind of why the image is out there, to expose people to those images more, and desensitize them to it.  Black power is still scary to a lot of people.  It shouldn’t be something to be afraid of.  Black Power is a necessity.”
- Dexter Ryan Jones (artist/photographer)IG: sirdexrjones

yes!

Love this. It’s so fabulous.
theeverimaginable:

radtasticly-anomalous:

sirdexrjones:

You often feature Black people in a positive, stylish and sometimes provocative light. Is there a specific reason for this?
"I don’t know when it all started, but for a years, I’ve been very color-conscious. I’ve been very race-conscious, and I’m very aware that I’m not just an artist, but a black artist. And I have no problem with that. I’m very careful about how we are portrayed. I know that if you google the word ‘beauty’ right now, 99.9 percent of the faces that come up will be a white woman’s face, and that’s a bit astonishing. And, I don’t know, I just feel like images speak volumes, and when I speak to people through my images, I just want to make sure I’m saying something positive when it comes to the issue of Black women or Black men.
I also tell negative stories, I can show an ugly side or tell an ugly truth, but at the end of it all I want the message to be something beautiful and positive that not just Black people can relate to but everyone can relate to, and I want everyone to understand it. But that’s not always going to happen. Not everyone is going to look at my work and see beautiful, stylized, somewhat provocative photos. I guess some people will just see ‘ugly naked bodies’ or ‘pornographic images’; ‘uncombed afros’ or long ‘unkempt dreadlocks’. But that’s kind of why the image is out there, to expose people to those images more, and desensitize them to it.  Black power is still scary to a lot of people.  It shouldn’t be something to be afraid of.  Black Power is a necessity.”
- Dexter Ryan Jones (artist/photographer)IG: sirdexrjones

yes!

Love this. It’s so fabulous.
theeverimaginable:

radtasticly-anomalous:

sirdexrjones:

You often feature Black people in a positive, stylish and sometimes provocative light. Is there a specific reason for this?
"I don’t know when it all started, but for a years, I’ve been very color-conscious. I’ve been very race-conscious, and I’m very aware that I’m not just an artist, but a black artist. And I have no problem with that. I’m very careful about how we are portrayed. I know that if you google the word ‘beauty’ right now, 99.9 percent of the faces that come up will be a white woman’s face, and that’s a bit astonishing. And, I don’t know, I just feel like images speak volumes, and when I speak to people through my images, I just want to make sure I’m saying something positive when it comes to the issue of Black women or Black men.
I also tell negative stories, I can show an ugly side or tell an ugly truth, but at the end of it all I want the message to be something beautiful and positive that not just Black people can relate to but everyone can relate to, and I want everyone to understand it. But that’s not always going to happen. Not everyone is going to look at my work and see beautiful, stylized, somewhat provocative photos. I guess some people will just see ‘ugly naked bodies’ or ‘pornographic images’; ‘uncombed afros’ or long ‘unkempt dreadlocks’. But that’s kind of why the image is out there, to expose people to those images more, and desensitize them to it.  Black power is still scary to a lot of people.  It shouldn’t be something to be afraid of.  Black Power is a necessity.”
- Dexter Ryan Jones (artist/photographer)IG: sirdexrjones

yes!

Love this. It’s so fabulous.
theeverimaginable:

radtasticly-anomalous:

sirdexrjones:

You often feature Black people in a positive, stylish and sometimes provocative light. Is there a specific reason for this?
"I don’t know when it all started, but for a years, I’ve been very color-conscious. I’ve been very race-conscious, and I’m very aware that I’m not just an artist, but a black artist. And I have no problem with that. I’m very careful about how we are portrayed. I know that if you google the word ‘beauty’ right now, 99.9 percent of the faces that come up will be a white woman’s face, and that’s a bit astonishing. And, I don’t know, I just feel like images speak volumes, and when I speak to people through my images, I just want to make sure I’m saying something positive when it comes to the issue of Black women or Black men.
I also tell negative stories, I can show an ugly side or tell an ugly truth, but at the end of it all I want the message to be something beautiful and positive that not just Black people can relate to but everyone can relate to, and I want everyone to understand it. But that’s not always going to happen. Not everyone is going to look at my work and see beautiful, stylized, somewhat provocative photos. I guess some people will just see ‘ugly naked bodies’ or ‘pornographic images’; ‘uncombed afros’ or long ‘unkempt dreadlocks’. But that’s kind of why the image is out there, to expose people to those images more, and desensitize them to it.  Black power is still scary to a lot of people.  It shouldn’t be something to be afraid of.  Black Power is a necessity.”
- Dexter Ryan Jones (artist/photographer)IG: sirdexrjones

yes!

Love this. It’s so fabulous.

theeverimaginable:

radtasticly-anomalous:

sirdexrjones:

You often feature Black people in a positive, stylish and sometimes provocative light. Is there a specific reason for this?

"I don’t know when it all started, but for a years, I’ve been very color-conscious. I’ve been very race-conscious, and I’m very aware that I’m not just an artist, but a black artist. And I have no problem with that. I’m very careful about how we are portrayed. I know that if you google the word ‘beauty’ right now, 99.9 percent of the faces that come up will be a white woman’s face, and that’s a bit astonishing. And, I don’t know, I just feel like images speak volumes, and when I speak to people through my images, I just want to make sure I’m saying something positive when it comes to the issue of Black women or Black men.

I also tell negative stories, I can show an ugly side or tell an ugly truth, but at the end of it all I want the message to be something beautiful and positive that not just Black people can relate to but everyone can relate to, and I want everyone to understand it. But that’s not always going to happen. Not everyone is going to look at my work and see beautiful, stylized, somewhat provocative photos. I guess some people will just see ‘ugly naked bodies’ or ‘pornographic images’; ‘uncombed afros’ or long ‘unkempt dreadlocks’. But that’s kind of why the image is out there, to expose people to those images more, and desensitize them to it.  Black power is still scary to a lot of people.  It shouldn’t be something to be afraid of.  Black Power is a necessity.”

- Dexter Ryan Jones (artist/photographer)
IG: sirdexrjones

yes!

Love this. It’s so fabulous.

medievalpoc:

dynamicafrica:

The Egyptian Mona Lisa
I never get bored of people playing around with DaVinci’s, especially when non-Western artists provide their own take on the ever-mysterious painting that is the Mona Lisa.
Here, Egyptian illustrator FaTma WaGdi places herself wearing a hijab in her digital rendition of this 16th century portrait, poking fun at the expressionless original subject.

Contemporary Art Week!
medievalpoc:

dynamicafrica:

The Egyptian Mona Lisa
I never get bored of people playing around with DaVinci’s, especially when non-Western artists provide their own take on the ever-mysterious painting that is the Mona Lisa.
Here, Egyptian illustrator FaTma WaGdi places herself wearing a hijab in her digital rendition of this 16th century portrait, poking fun at the expressionless original subject.

Contemporary Art Week!
medievalpoc:

dynamicafrica:

The Egyptian Mona Lisa
I never get bored of people playing around with DaVinci’s, especially when non-Western artists provide their own take on the ever-mysterious painting that is the Mona Lisa.
Here, Egyptian illustrator FaTma WaGdi places herself wearing a hijab in her digital rendition of this 16th century portrait, poking fun at the expressionless original subject.

Contemporary Art Week!
medievalpoc:

dynamicafrica:

The Egyptian Mona Lisa
I never get bored of people playing around with DaVinci’s, especially when non-Western artists provide their own take on the ever-mysterious painting that is the Mona Lisa.
Here, Egyptian illustrator FaTma WaGdi places herself wearing a hijab in her digital rendition of this 16th century portrait, poking fun at the expressionless original subject.

Contemporary Art Week!
medievalpoc:

dynamicafrica:

The Egyptian Mona Lisa
I never get bored of people playing around with DaVinci’s, especially when non-Western artists provide their own take on the ever-mysterious painting that is the Mona Lisa.
Here, Egyptian illustrator FaTma WaGdi places herself wearing a hijab in her digital rendition of this 16th century portrait, poking fun at the expressionless original subject.

Contemporary Art Week!

medievalpoc:

dynamicafrica:

The Egyptian Mona Lisa

I never get bored of people playing around with DaVinci’s, especially when non-Western artists provide their own take on the ever-mysterious painting that is the Mona Lisa.

Here, Egyptian illustrator FaTma WaGdi places herself wearing a hijab in her digital rendition of this 16th century portrait, poking fun at the expressionless original subject.

Contemporary Art Week!

yungblacksucia:

thanoblesavage:

What are y’all thoughts on this?

I feel like early gangsta rap was just real life. Take NWA or Tupac or Bone Thugz, they were rapping about killing & drugs cuz that’s actually what was going on with them. Those situations came about from the poverty & crime in the area they were born into, so they made that music. Plus, we already know that they experienced racism daily from police which also gave the “gangsta” image another facet.

Basically, gangsta rap is not unauthentic in my opinion. It’s our real struggles & that’s why we first created it. I do believe that most of the *current* gangsta rap was manufactured by white music label CEOs in order to perpetuate violence and mentacide in the Black community.

vintageblackglamour:

I would like to extend Easter greetings to everyone celebrating today with this beautiful photograph of two women in Harlem on Easter Sunday 1947 by the legendary French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson (1908-2004). My favorite fun fact about Mr. Cartier-Bresson is that he and Langston Hughes were roommates as young struggling artists in Mexico in the 1930s. Photo: Henri Cartier-Bresson/Magnum Photos.

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